News

Autumn Paws, Claws and More – download the full edition here: MHPH Autumn 2021

Autumn is a time where the weather is changing from warm to cold weather. When the weather cools down, symptoms of joint pain and arthritis are exacerbated; if you have an older pet who you believe is suffering make sure to chat to your vet as there are a lot of option to help make your pet comfortable in the cooler months.

Even though it is becoming cooler and we’d all much rather stay in our warm beds, it’s important to make sure you still take your dog on regular walks for their daily exercise and encourage you cats to chase and play with toys.

Their coats will be transitioning from short hair to long, so you may notice an increase in hair loss leading up to winter we recommend continuing to groom your pet during the cooler months.

Even though it is becoming colder, fleas and ticks are still around. The only way to prevent flea outbreaks is to remain on top of your flea treatment regimen year round! Likewise, ticks may remain prevalent until later in autumn, so you need to be tick-aware. So don’t forget to check your pet’s flea and tick prevention is up to date.

Easter is also fast approaching. As always it is extremely important to keep those yummy chocolates away from the dogs, as this can cause chocolate toxicity. Chocolate toxicity signs are vomiting, diarrhoea, increase in thirst,  panting, restlessness, excessive urination or a racing heart. It is important that if you see your dog eat the chocolate to call  and let the vets know ASAP. Some other food to be mindful of are grapes, macadamia nuts, artificial sweeteners, onions and garlic along with plants such as lilies as these are toxic to cats.

 

 

Did you know that a Purple Poppy is to commemorate all the deeds and sacrifices animals made in war? The purple poppy is often worn alongside the traditional red poppy as  a reminder that both humans and animals have and  continue to serve. Meet Sergeant Stubby, one of the brave animals who served in WWI.

In 1917 when he was a puppy, Stubby was found wandering through the fields of Yale University by Private Robert J. Conroy who was undergoing military training in the area at the time. He decided to name the little dog with a short tail Stubby.

Conroy brought Stubby back to camp, and although pets were not allowed, Stubby proved good for the soldiers’ morale and was able to stay. While living with the soldiers, clever young

Stubby trained as well. He learned how to salute with his paw and became familiar with bugle calls and marching routines.

He became a much beloved member of the 102nd Infantry Battalion of the United States army and served in 17 battles during WWI.

He had to be smuggled back home—dogs still weren’t allowed on the ship—but when he arrived on American soil he was an instant celebrity. He had served faithfully in the war, saving many lives and earning nearly a dozen medals for various deeds.

After a while, Conroy and Stubby settled down at Georgetown, where Conroy studied law. Stubby was made the mascot for the Georgetown football team. During halftime at the games, he would wander the field nudging the football around and entertaining the fans, one of the first halftime shows in history.

Parvovirus and Canine Cough Alert
There has been an alarming amount of the deadly parvovirus or parvo in the Newcastle and Hunter Region. Parvo is a highly contagious disease that affects unvaccinated puppies and
adult dogs. Symptoms include: Vomiting, lethargy, diarrhoea (usually bloody and foul smelling) and a fever.
Canine cough is a highly contagious upper respiratory virus which can be easily spread wherever dogs interact and socialise such as dog parks, boarding kennels and obedienceclasses. Canine cough presents as a dry hacking cough and can cause the pet to gag and vomit. If unsure of your pets vaccination status, please check with our friendly nurses

Did you know that a Purple Poppy is to commemorate all the deeds and sacrifices animals made in war? The purple poppy is often worn alongside the traditional red poppy as  a reminder that both humans and animals have and  continue to serve. Meet Sergeant Stubby, one of the brave animals who served in WWI.

In 1917 when he was a puppy, Stubby was found wandering through the fields of Yale University by Private Robert J. Conroy who was undergoing military training in the area at the time. He decided to name the little dog with a short tail Stubby.

Conroy brought Stubby back to camp, and although pets were not allowed, Stubby proved good for the soldiers’ morale and was able to stay. While living with the soldiers, clever young

Stubby trained as well. He learned how to salute with his paw and became familiar with bugle calls and marching routines.

He became a much beloved member of the 102nd Infantry Battalion of the United States army and served in 17 battles during WWI.

He had to be smuggled back home—dogs still weren’t allowed on the ship—but when he arrived on American soil he was an instant celebrity. He had served faithfully in the war, saving many lives and earning nearly a dozen medals for various deeds.

After a while, Conroy and Stubby settled down at Georgetown, where Conroy studied law. Stubby was made the mascot for the Georgetown football team. During halftime at the games, he would wander the field nudging the football around and entertaining the fans, one of the first halftime shows in history.

Staff profile
~ Katelin ~

Hey there, my name is Katelin and I’m one of the nurses at Mount Hutton Pet Hospital. I graduated my Cert IV vet nursing course in June 2018. I enjoy going to the gym and spending time at the beach in the sun. I unfortunately don’t have any fur babies, so I just love yours as if they were my own.

 

 

 

 

Which reptile is best for you?

You have decided that you would like to keep a reptilian pet so now you must decide which one is most suitable for you. Reptiles come in a much greater variety of shapes and sizes than a dog or a cat but there is one to suit most people. Important factors to consider are housing requirements, feeding regime, hygiene, costs, licensing, maintenance, personal safety, and many more. Personal preference is another huge factor and if you have always dreamt of keeping a certain species then, as long as you are aware of its requirements, you should definitely choose that particular pet. It’s only relatively recently (about 15 years) that the law was changed to allow people to keep Australian native reptile species and before this time heavy penalties applied for their illegal possession.

A licensing system applies only to certain species, they can only be obtained from registered breeders or licenced individuals. Further details are provided on the National Parks and Wildlife website. The easiest way to rate each species is by the criteria mentioned earlier and compare them accordingly. As far as feeding, the snakes are, by far the easiest to satisfy.

Whole food items such as pre-killed frozen rats and mice are all that is needed for a happy snake. They are relatively inexpensive and readily available from a vast majority of pet stores. If you are uncomfortable with this then the lizard species such as a Bearded Dragon may be best but they require a more complex diet that includes greens and insects, they must be supplemented with calcium regularly. Lizards are daily feeders but snakes can go for extended periods without eating after a large meal.

Housing; Lizards, dragons and snakes are all relatively easy to maintain and keep with the right setup. A good UV light, heat source and a suitable substrate are all that’s needed. They are relatively inexpensive to acquire and incur low running costs and require minimal maintenance if a reliable brand is purchased. Tortoises, on the other hand, require a complex filtered semi-aquatic environment and have curious dietary habits so should be avoided by the novice keeper. They are notoriously tricky to keep but can be very interesting pets. Irrespective of the type of reptile, they must be maintained in a hygienic environment and regular cleaning i s essential. A watery habitat is much harder to manage in this regard.

When considering the criteria for reptile selection then I would have to vote for a snake. They are easiest to obtain, maintain and keep healthy. I don’t say this out of personal bias due to having kept snakes all my life but rather as someone who has experienced the pros and cons of keeping a vast array of Australian reptiles in all shapes and forms. Dragons and lizards are attractive due to their dietary habits but need just a little more care for keeping healthy. In the next newsletter I will compare individual species and suggest which one will be right for you.

~ Dr Ray Burton ~

Grooming

There are many different coat styles on cats and dogs. Curly, wired, long haired and double coat pets, all who will need their coats prepared for the oncoming winter months.

If they are not regularly brushed or have their coat clipped they can end up with severe knots and matting. Matt’s are the tight knots that form in the fur, not only can these be uncomfortable for our pets but they also have the ability to trap moisture between skin and the fur which can cause skin irritations, which may then need to be treated by a vet.

Depending on the style of coat, your pet does not necessarily need to have a full clip during the cooler months, they could have a full brush out which gets rid of the extra fur and or undercoat as they are malting, a half groom to leave their coat looking beautiful and long, while tidying up the face, feet, nails and hygiene areas, or just a hygiene clip under the tummy and around the bottom and genitals. Our wonderful Stylists Melissa and Jess would love to meet your pets.

Puppy Preschool was designed to allow puppies to socialise with other dogs in a safe, comfortable and controlled environment. It a great way to introduce your puppy to a vet clinic in a positive way, most puppies that come to puppy preschool love to come in and visit the staff greeting us with happy wagging tails.

We teach you how to teach your puppy and introduces the basic manners such as ‘Sit’, ‘Drop’, ‘Roll Over’, ‘Come’ and ‘Stand’ to name a few. We also go through puppy care such as diet and nutrition, flea control, worming and tick treatments. Your trainer will also discuss grooming, enrichment, toilet training and much more.

Our trainers are all qualified veterinary nurses with years of experience. Classes are held right in here at the clinic within the covid safe guidelines. Currently we are allowed 1 person per puppy to attend classes, depending on class size.

If your puppy is between 8 weeks and 14 weeks of age and you are interested, bookings are essential so please contact us on Ph: 4947 1311 or Email: reception@mthuttonvet.com.a